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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. robert, we were just talk towing. you took a tour of red hook an area here in new york city that was devastated. >> devastated. the sad thing is red hook has come such a long way. many entrepreneurs have set up shop there, i visit ad winery, wonderful man who makes key lime pies, glass cutter, designers, completely wiped out. 300 jobs at fairway, big supermarket there wiped out. and many of them are fighting back and looking to get back on their feet. >> i want to take this in two parts. what can you do if you're hit by a disaster and second what can you do to prepare for this. gerald talk to me very quickly. if you're a small business owner that was affected by this, where can you go? >> well the first thing that i would say is call our help desk. the u.s. chamber of commerce has set up national disaster help desk for small businesses to call if they don't know where to turn. that number is 1-888-my-biz-help which is 888-692-4943. we're asking small businesses to call our help desk. we have experienced counselors that are standing by to help businesses figure out the best w
sachs and new york city development corporation to get that out. the good news is that many over 1,000 inquiries already and dozens of companies are already in the pipeline for those loans. to get that 10, 15, 20, 25,000 dollars out so people can pay their workers and do the necessary repairs. >> let's talk about going forward. it's awful. if you're a small business watching this what can you do to prepare for a disaster that might hit you whether it is a tornado or an earthquake or another hurricane? >> make sure you have the right insurance. make sure you have flood insurance. many people don't understand that flood insurance is separate from their typical insurance, it's run by the federal government. so, you know, making sure you have those things. if you have inventory that's going to spoil, make being sure you have a generator in case you lose power. making sure your employees are prepared, your suppliers are prepared. >> couldn't emphasize enough. what gerald also said is insurance. sadly we run into so many companies that did not have their paper work in order. and don't ha
of the workforce. in the quiet new york city suburb of maplewood, new jersey, another bookstore almost disappeared until jonah and emily came to the rescue. even though they knew nothing about the book business. >> when jonah came he didn't have a bookstore background, so he was depending on us to be able to help him out. >> with the change in ownership became a change in management style. she was hand on on, doing most of the work herself. a recent graduate of business school, jonah was very idea in job crafting to better utilize the talents of his staff. >> it's changing the jobs to fit the people rather than the people to fit the jobs. now that can't always work 100%. sometimes we have to buckle down and do something we're not good at or don't like, but as much as possible, it's in everyone's interest if people are doing what they're good at and what they like. >> with an experienced staff already in place he worked with each of them to determine their likes and dislikes. >> so for instance, she does the ordering. that's really her specialty. i do the scheduling, the tech stuff, things like tha
. >>> in the quiet new york city suburb of maplewood, new jersey, another independent bookstore almost disappeared. that was until jonah and ellen zimely came to the rescue. they knew nothing about the book business. >> when jonah came, he didn't have a bookstore background. he was depending on us to be able to help him out with that. >> with the change in ownership came a change in management style. the former bookstore owner was hands on doing most of the work of her store herself. a recent graduate of business school, jonah was interested in the idea of job crafting to better utilize the talent of his staff. >> it's -- that can't always work 100%. sometimes you have to buckle down and do something we're not good at or don't like. as much as possible, it's in everyone's interest if they do what they are good at and what they like to do. >> he worked with each of them to determine their likes and dislikes and did his best to play to their strengths. >> she does the ordering. it's her specialty. i do the scheduling, the tech stuff, things like that. i have more responsibilities now than i did befo
experiences to help everyone see eye to eye. ♪ on a recent tuesday afternoon in new york city, the employees of the internet company she finds took a break from working on the site to work on themselves. throwing paint? that's working on themselves? in this case, yes. through a series of exercises, the she finds employees were working through a number of personal issues they were having at work. >> you really have two parts of the office. we have editorial and we have sales and marketing. if you've ever worked in magazines and media, those two usually don't mix very well. >> a situation she finds founder michelle maddic had to resolve. >> all we do is make it easy for busy women to shop online. we scour the web for the best of the best, and we tell you how to get it. >> but expanding business and different personalities working together, tensions arose between departments. >> i constantly have to play the mediator between the two. trying to say, you don't understand what they're doing and what's happening on the other side. >> hoping to increase communication and understanding in the office,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)